Woman who made Bernie Sanders' viral inauguration mittens says she's out of stock

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Scores of people have become enthralled with Sen. Bernie Sanders' mittens after his inaugural attire went viral.

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The only problem: The Vermont elementary school teacher who crafted them out of recycled wool is completely sold out.

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"Sadly, I have no more mittens for sale," Jen Ellis wrote in a tweet after Sanders' casual winter outfit took the Internet by storm on Wednesday.

During the inaugural ceremonies on Wednesday, Sanders wore a brown winter jacket made by Burton Snowboards and a pair of mittens, which spawned countless memes online. Consequently, it also helped to highlight Ellis' creation. All the buzz prompted her to notify potential customers that she no longer has any mittens left in stock.

"It truly has been an amazing and historic day! I'm so flattered that Bernie wore them to the inauguration," she wrote.

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Instead, Ellis directed her Twitter followers to Etsy where "there are a lot of great crafters" who make them.

A few days later, Ellis had found "another source for Bernie Mittens." It's her former business partner who helped to design the mitten pattern. Her partner is currently selling the coveted gloves and is ready to ship them, Ellis said. With all the buzz and hundreds of retweets, though, that might might not be true for too long.

The self-described democratic socialist from Vermont had received the gloves from Ellis' daughter who went to a child care center owned by one of his relatives and was able to slip them into his hands.

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Ellis was grateful but taken aback when he donned the pair of gloves during the 46th inaugural ceremonies.

However, he also wore the mittens before while running for president in 2020 and in interviews with Vermont journalists.

"What started out as a simple act of kindness more than 2 years ago has grown into something beyond my imagination!" she said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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